How to connect standoffs to Shaft Collar

  1. 2 months ago

    Joshua_84927A

    Dec 5 Virginia 84927A Team Leader

    How do I connect standoffs to shaft collars? I see people do this all the time for structural support but I've never figured out how to do it.

  2. Mystellianne

    Dec 5 Miami, Florida 4411W

    This might help.

  3. Joshua_84927A

    Dec 5 Virginia 84927A Team Leader

    Thank you!

  4. Jawdin_1233f

    Dec 6 Northern Indiana 1233F

    My team is actually thinking about doing this for a four bar. It is going to, if all goes as planned, be attached to a few axles and have some couplers with axle collars on them. On the end of this will be the intake. Love this idea.

  5. Cmills1352

    Dec 6 Hazel Green, Alabama 8685C

    Use couplers instead of the screw in the shaft collar

  6. Download Complete

    Dec 6 Greater London, UK 7975F

    If you don’t have any couplers and don’t really want to buy them you can always just cut the heads off 1” or 0.5” screws.

  7. @Download Complete If you don’t have any couplers and don’t really want to buy them you can always just cut the heads off 1” or 0.5” screws.

    Have you actually done this? We've cut screws before and the threads don't like having nuts (or standoffs) put on them. You would probably have to take a die set and recut the threads, and even then it would be difficult to even screw them in.

  8. Easton

    Dec 6 Loganville, GA, USA 1958 A

    @Eagles_C Have you actually done this? We've cut screws before and the threads don't like having nuts (or standoffs) put on them. You would probably have to take a die set and recut the threads, and even then it would be difficult to even screw them in.

    We have done it for a ton of screws, and it works great for us. We use a dremel drill with a metal cutting tip. It makes it maybe a tiny bit harder to screw in, but it's not really noticeable.

  9. @Easton We have done it for a ton of screws, and it works great for us. We use a dremel drill with a metal cutting tip. It makes it maybe a tiny bit harder to screw in, but it's not really noticeable.

    Ah. Never occurred to me to use a dremel. We used a bolt cutters.

  10. Easton

    Dec 6 Loganville, GA, USA 1958 A

    @Eagles_C Ah. Never occurred to me to use a dremel. We used a bolt cutters.

    Yeah a dremel is good, since it doesn't damage the threads around the cut. Bolt cutters, would obviously damage the threads a lot.

  11. jpearman

    Dec 6 Moderator, ROBOTC Tech Support, V5 Beta Moderator Rockstar, Los Angeles 8888

    examples.
    https://www.vexforum.com/index.php/conversation/post/82002

  12. @Easton Yeah a dremel is good, since it doesn't damage the threads around the cut. Bolt cutters, would obviously damage the threads a lot.

    We have a dremel, I just never thought of using one.

  13. Dremel: a teams best friend

  14. callen

    Dec 6 Braintree, MA, USA

    When you cut a screw, you should do it with nuts already on it. You can then unscrew the nut over the threads where it was cut, letting the uncut threads guide the nut. That nearly always fixes whatever problem you caused with the cutting.

  15. Download Complete

    Dec 6 Greater London, UK 7975F

    From my experience a little bit of damage to the thread is ok and sometimes even helpful as it helps to keep the screw in place. Or you could just make a clean cut and use thread lock instead.

 

or Sign Up to reply!