1. 7 months ago
    Edited 7 months ago by Rod

    I've seen a lot of people talk about build quality like some mysterious concept. I think a discussion of build quality could really help some newer teams avoid some mistakes and give more experienced teams a quick reference and reminder.

    What is good build quality to you? What makes a robot better built than the rest? Tips and tricks?

    Compiled list of everything I've seen so far.

    • Accurate spacing on axles - tight to reduce slop, not to tight to avoid extra friction
    • Pieces of metal line up - keep everything square, avoid slightly bending metal
    • Bearings, Bearings, Bearings!
    • Using screws as axles wherever possible - drastically reduces slop and increases joint strength.
    • Nylock nuts. Especially on bearings and gear attachments - reduces impact of vibration
    • Loctite blue everywhere - prevents screws from backing out from vibration
    • Use two bearings on axles - reduce slop
    • get the nice setscrews and use Loctite in shaft collars - stronger hold, won't loosen as easily.
  2. Dokkaebi

    9 Jan 2018 Deal with it I like chocolate

    @Rod I've seen a lot of people talk about build quality like some mysterious concept. I think a discussion of build quality could really help some newer teams avoid some mistakes and give more experienced teams a quick reference and reminder.

    What is good build quality to you? What makes a robot better built than the rest? Tips and tricks?

    What comes to mind for me:

    • Accurate spacing on axles - tight to reduce slop, not to tight to avoid extra friction
    • Pieces of metal line up - keep everything square, avoid slightly bending metal
    • Bearings, Bearings, Bearings!
    • Using screws as axles wherever possible - drastically reduces slop and increases joint strength.

    Also using Nylock nuts on bearings and gear attachments really helps, as that is where the most vibration is. Also use blue locktite EVERYWHERE

  3. @Dokkaebi Also use blue locktite EVERYWHERE

    Most places I get, but do you use it in Nylocks?

  4. Dokkaebi

    9 Jan 2018 Deal with it I like chocolate
    Edited 7 months ago by Dokkaebi

    No

  5. ₁₉₆₁Ayush

    9 Jan 2018 SFHS, Cumming, Georgia ₁₉₆₁

    @Rod Most places I get, but do you use it in Nylocks?

    oof...

    Also, make sure you use two bearings when using an axle for minimum slop.

  6. Dokkaebi

    9 Jan 2018 Deal with it I like chocolate

    I use the Nylocks mainly for the screw joints like @Rod mentioned above. I also bought the higher quality shaft (hehe) collar set screws, and those have made a pretty big impact in my opinion.

  7. Easton

    9 Jan 2018 GA, USA 1958A

    @Dokkaebi I use the Nylocks mainly for the screw joints like @Rod mentioned above. I also bought the higher quality shaft (hehe) collar set screws, and those have made a pretty big impact in my opinion.

    Yeah we just had a very large order come in, which included the clamping shaft collars. I must say they are much better, and I highly recommend buying some for anyone who doesn't have any. The only disadvantage is their size, they can't fit in compact spaces.

  8. Dokkaebi

    9 Jan 2018 Deal with it I like chocolate
    Edited 7 months ago by Dokkaebi

    @Easton Yeah we just had a very large order come in, which included the clamping shaft collars. I must say they are much better, and I highly recommend buying some for anyone who doesn't have any. The only disadvantage is their size, they can't fit in compact spaces.

    No no I mean. I bought new set screws for the regular shaft collars. Nothing wrong with them and they are pretty small.

  9. Easton

    9 Jan 2018 GA, USA 1958A

    @Dokkaebi No no I mean. I bought new set screws for the regular shaft collars. Nothing wrong with them and they are pretty small.

    Oh ok. Well I still like the plastic ones much better, they never come undone since they have nylocks, and they don't damage the axles at all

  10. 917F

    10 Jan 2018 Redmond, Washington

    @Easton Oh ok. Well I still like the plastic ones much better, they never come undone since they have nylocks, and they don't damage the axles at all

    I bought one set of those when they came out just to try. Every single one broke on the first use. Split right down the middle where the screw sits. Not sure if I did something wrong but it they just don't tighten.
    Oh well. I'm fine using upgraded metal shaft collars.

  11. DaveP

    10 Jan 2018 Event Partner

    Keep your tools sharp.....Stripped tools strip screws - stripped screws strip tools.

  12. AG256

    10 Jan 2018 Towson, Maryland 934M

    Cantilever towers and other structural metal that might bend.

  13. @AG256 Cantilever towers and other structural metal that might bend.

    What do you mean by cantilever? Add support?

  14. AG256

    10 Jan 2018 Towson, Maryland 934M
    Edited 7 months ago by AG256

    Cantilevering is when you attach a beam (or c-channel) between two other c-channels to form a supportive triangle that will prevent the angle between the two beams from changing or bending. From my experience, a lift without cantilevers will almost always bend in the direction of the linkages, which is why you should place the cantilever on the side of the tower that the linkages are on. This is an image of my old robot from October. We have a standoff as a cantilever in front of the tower connecting the drive and the tower which prevented the tower from bending. In hindsight, it would've been more effective if we had cantilevered them at a 45 degree angle but it still provides a lot of support

  15. Based off of what I know cantilevering is where an object is supported by only on side, anchoring something isn't called a cantilever.

  16. AG256

    10 Jan 2018 Towson, Maryland 934M

    @Ethan W. Based off of what I know cantilevering is where an object is supported by only on side, anchoring something isn't called a cantilever.

    My bad. I meant a braced cantilever where the towers are the cantilever, and the standoffs are what braces the towers to the drive.

  17. Its all good.

  18. Easton

    10 Jan 2018 GA, USA 1958A

    Make sure something that isn't supposed to move, doesn't move, and something that is supposed to move, moves with little friction

  19. Robo_Eng_13

    10 Jan 2018 Indiana 1483

    For Reference

  20. Deleted 7 months ago by Rod
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