Turning Point | Team 240P Early Season Reveal: "Low Quality"

  1. 3 months ago

    proto

    Jul 8 Auckland, New Zealand 240P

    Team 240P are proud to present our first robot “Low Quality”

    Specs:

    • 8m 1:1 Turbo 4" Bling Drive
    • 2m 1:7 Turbo linkage RD4B
    • 1m 1:1 Torque wrist

    For our first robot, we were limited by our available parts and lack of game elements. Due to this we mainly focused on quickly scoring and flipping caps. We learnt a lot about the challenges of the game through testing this robot and look forward to further competing throughout the season.

    Low Quality is no more….
    Medium Quality Coming Soon

  2. The_One_and_Only_Sal

    Jul 8 Suspended Washington URDON3
    This post was ghostwritten by:
    - Rolanda Tyson
    - Serita Alves
    - Bulah Applegate
    - Willette Carrasco
    - Jillian Julian
    - Wanita Minnick
    - Joane Bunting
    - Lorie Proctor
    - Dennis Hearn
    - Lashanda Osteen
    - Yelena Villasenor
    - Treva Embry
    - Meda Bisson
    - Fransisca Herbert
    - Evon Unger
    - Tijuana Colbert
    - Janessa Hendrick
    - Isadora Spring
    - Joshua Brand
    - Anton Milton
    - Tamiko Flagg
    - Lizbeth Colson
    - Kindra Horne
    - Else Pringle
    - Tora Bartels

    I love it! Could you post some close-up pictures of that nonpowered encoder wheel? Also, did you use a gyroscope?

    -Sal

  3. proto

    Jul 8 Auckland, New Zealand 240P
    Edited 3 months ago by proto

    @The_One_and_Only_Sal This post was ghostwritten by: - Rolanda Tyson - Serita Alves - Bulah Applegate - Willette Carrasco - Jillian Julian - Wanita Minnick - Joane Bunting - Lorie Proctor - Dennis Hearn - Lashanda Osteen - Yelena Villasenor - Treva Embry - Meda Bisson - Fransisca Herbert - Evon Unger - Tijuana Colbert - Janessa Hendrick - Isadora Spring - Joshua Brand - Anton Milton - Tamiko Flagg - Lizbeth Colson - Kindra Horne - Else Pringle - Tora Bartels

    I love it! Could you post some close-up pictures of that nonpowered encoder wheel? Also, did you use a gyroscope?

    -Sal

    Here you go,
    imytK4rYKCyWj9gIYwmz801Gr_Hv5pEj5Wp8ZXF1NuzSv-Z1AsPSQ00Kx7xLT97gTLncXdFFArHEdFOkVgeGoHDkJ08hvg7MbVaW.png
    IMG_20180702_171332.jpg

    And yes, we do use a gyro.

  4. JamsG

    Jul 8 a place in southern california 310A

    if you call this robot low quality, your team is very well-off

  5. The_One_and_Only_Sal

    Jul 8 Suspended Washington URDON3

    @proto Here you go,
    [attachment:5b415d1831364]
    [attachment:5b415e5528e4e]

    And yes, we do use a gyro.

    This post was ghostwritten by:
    - Rolanda Tyson
    - Serita Alves
    - Bulah Applegate
    - Willette Carrasco
    - Jillian Julian
    - Wanita Minnick
    - Joane Bunting
    - Lorie Proctor
    - Dennis Hearn
    - Lashanda Osteen
    - Yelena Villasenor
    - Treva Embry
    - Meda Bisson
    - Fransisca Herbert
    - Evon Unger
    - Tijuana Colbert
    - Janessa Hendrick
    - Isadora Spring
    - Joshua Brand
    - Anton Milton
    - Tamiko Flagg
    - Lizbeth Colson
    - Kindra Horne
    - Else Pringle
    - Tora Bartels

    Thanks! We really appreciate it :D Can't wait for Medium Quality! :P

  6. Are you powering the center wheel directly or using chain for it? Loved the video (especially the wheel on the arm).

  7. @ReeseSteindler

    The center wheel pictured above is an unpowered wheel (no motors attached) that rolls along with the robot, and turns the attached encoder. This is usually called an encoder wheel (or something similar). To make sure that the encoder wheel is always touching the ground even when the robot is crossing over on uneven surface (the platforms this season or the pipes last season) there are rubber bands that pull the encoder wheel down. This is similar to how a suspension works in vehicles.

    You might be more familiar with teams attaching their encoders directly to the powered wheels and can get sensor values like that, however the issue with attaching them directly to the powered wheels is that wheels can slip and throw off the reading of the encoder. This can be a serious issue when the robot needs to autonomously cross over uneven surfaces such as those that I mentioned earlier.

    Take for example robot A has the encoder attached directly to the powered wheels, and robot B has an encoder wheel. Both robots are very light and their wheels skid when they first accelerate. Their task is to park on the alliance platform during autonomous. As both robots drive up the platform, their wheels slip as they try to get enough traction to get on to the platform completely. They have been programmed to drive 1000 encoder counts and stop. In this case the physical robots are not moving, even though the wheels are turning, robot A will think that it has reached the target sensor value and stop because that's how much the wheels have turned, but robot B will continue to drive because the encoder wheel measures how far the physical robot has moved and the robot has not physically moved the 1000 encoder counts yet.

    Even on flat surfaces, robot B will drive more accurate distances, even with wheel slip, because the encoder wheel measures how far the robot has physically moved unlike robot A that measures how much the wheels have turned.

    The trade off with encoder wheels is that they take up more space and can be a bit harder to design and build. That is why many teams stick to attaching encoders like robot A and might use fusion of other sensors and more advanced programming to improve their accuracy.

    Hopefully that makes sense :)

    Also to team 240P: Great early season robot, can't wait for Medium Quality!

  8. @_Colossus_ @ReeseSteindler

    The center wheel pictured above is an unpowered wheel (no motors attached) that rolls along with the robot, and turns the attached encoder. This is usually called an encoder wheel (or something similar). To make sure that the encoder wheel is always touching the ground even when the robot is crossing over on uneven surface (the platforms this season or the pipes last season) there are rubber bands that pull the encoder wheel down. This is similar to how a suspension works in vehicles.

    You might be more familiar with teams attaching their encoders directly to the powered wheels and can get sensor values like that, however the issue with attaching them directly to the powered wheels is that wheels can slip and throw off the reading of the encoder. This can be a serious issue when the robot needs to autonomously cross over uneven surfaces such as those that I mentioned earlier.

    Take for example robot A has the encoder attached directly to the powered wheels, and robot B has an encoder wheel. Both robots are very light and their wheels skid when they first accelerate. Their task is to park on the alliance platform during autonomous. As both robots drive up the platform, their wheels slip as they try to get enough traction to get on to the platform completely. They have been programmed to drive 1000 encoder counts and stop. In this case the physical robots are not moving, even though the wheels are turning, robot A will think that it has reached the target sensor value and stop because that's how much the wheels have turned, but robot B will continue to drive because the encoder wheel measures how far the physical robot has moved and the robot has not physically moved the 1000 encoder counts yet.

    Even on flat surfaces, robot B will drive more accurate distances, even with wheel slip, because the encoder wheel measures how far the robot has physically moved unlike robot A that measures how much the wheels have turned.

    The trade off with encoder wheels is that they take up more space and can be a bit harder to design and build. That is why many teams stick to attaching encoders like robot A and might use fusion of other sensors and more advanced programming to improve their accuracy.

    Hopefully that makes sense :)

    Also to team 240P: Great early season robot, can't wait for Medium Quality!

    Oh that's really smart. Thanks so much!

  9. _7682

    Jul 8 V5 Beta Tester

    @proto Here you go,
    [attachment:5b415d1831364]
    [attachment:5b415e5528e4e]

    And yes, we do use a gyro.

    Looks familiar :)

  10. Blatherskite

    Jul 8 Austin TX 2158R
    Edited 3 months ago by Blatherskite

    your robot looks so similar to mine lmao. the specs are the same too.

  11. GBHS VEX Member

    Jul 8 Somewhere in California

    Why is the video in 1080 HD? fail

    Honestly, great job. Can't wait to hear great things from you in upcoming events!

  12. NightsRosario

    Jul 8 Reisterstown/Catonsville, MD 3922A

    My bois putting in work for the 1st robot. Just keep the momentum going and no choking in Nationals @proto

  13. proto

    Jul 9 Auckland, New Zealand 240P

    @_7682 Looks familiar :)

    You know it. ;)

    @GBHS VEX Member Why is the video in 1080 HD? fail
    Honestly, great job. Can't wait to hear great things from you in upcoming events!

    @_Colossus_ @ReeseSteindler
    Also to team 240P: Great early season robot, can't wait for Medium Quality!

    Thanks, feel free to ask any questions. <3 from 240p

    @NightsRosario My bois putting in work for the 1st robot. Just keep the momentum going and no choking in Nationals @proto

    Hey, Rahul was the one who choked. ;)

  14. antichamber

    Jul 9 Suspended Denver CO 80111 80110H

    @proto very nice robot! What made you decide to focus on caps instead of flags? Will medium quality score flags too?

  15. proto

    Jul 9 Auckland, New Zealand 240P

    @antichamber @proto very nice robot! What made you decide to focus on caps instead of flags? Will medium quality score flags too?

    Your first question can be answered in the first post.
    "For our first robot, we were limited by our available parts and lack of game elements. Due to this we mainly focused on quickly scoring and flipping caps. We learnt a lot about the challenges of the game through testing this robot and look forward to further competing throughout the season."

    And yes we don't see why not, as it is such a big part of the game.

 

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