1. 6 weeks ago

    bluspeed427

    Dec 10 A galaxy far, far, away... 902D

    Isn´t a clawbot model good for the competition?

  2. James6555

    Dec 10 68357A

    I hope you are joking cause I can’t tell.

  3. BBBcube3.14

    Dec 10 Middle of Nowhere 8410C
    Edited 6 weeks ago by BBBcube3.14

    A clawbot is a good robot if you this your first robot you are building. It can flip caps and hit the low flags. It also MIGHT be able to park. However it can't do high flags or stack caps on the posts. As I said before, I wouldn't bet money on its ability to park. In a noncompetitive state like SD a clawbot has won a state competition before, however you best be the greatest driver around and ally with a great team that can score where your robot can't.

  4. bluspeed427

    Dec 10 A galaxy far, far, away... 902D
    Edited 6 weeks ago by bluspeed427

    A clawbot is good to build at first for the competition and then you could add more onto it because my team´s robot for the comp. is working, and it´s based on the clawbot model. At least, that´s what I think.

  5. Hey does anyone know if for this season you can use the brain from last season?

  6. TheColdedge

    Dec 10 Event Partner Columbus, Indiana 1483
    Edited 6 weeks ago by TheColdedge

    My freshman team built a modified claw bot and they do remarkably well.

    basically they changed the drive to chain driven w/ 4 motors and took the claw off in favor of a hamburger flipper.

    They constantly rank in the top half and have been ranked as high as 7th.

    edit: I should note the driver is pretty capable and isn't phased by any challenge, so millage may vary

  7. bluspeed427

    Dec 10 A galaxy far, far, away... 902D
    Edited 6 weeks ago by bluspeed427

    Good to know!

  8. G.A.T Wrenches

    Dec 10 Groton 9050 C

    Best Team in State < ClawBot.... It happens.

  9. You'll learn a lot more from building your own design than just doing a clawbot. A good starting point is to build a custom flipper instead of the normal claw. And you can also use whatever motors you're not using to help add power to the drive train.

  10. Cam

    Dec 10 Ga Us ?

    The reason for vex is for kids/students to engineer robots and program them. If they use a claw bot (which is not good for their alliance) they are not learning the basics of engineering instead just copying an instruction manual.

    To help determine if a robot is a “separate robot” or not, use the Subsystem definitions found in <R1>. Above that, use common sense as referenced in <G2>. If you can place two robots on a table next to each other, and they look like two separate legal/complete robots (i.e. each have the 3 Subsystems defined by <R1>), then they are two robots. Trying to decide if changing a screw, a wheel, or a microcontroller constitutes a separate robot is missing the intent and spirit of this rule.

    So a claw bot can be considered illegal.

  11. @Cam The reason for vex is for kids/students to engineer robots and program them. If they use a claw bot (which is not good for their alliance) they are not learning the basics of engineering instead just copying an instruction manual. So a claw bot can be considered illegal.

    I don't think they should be illegal. That would crash quite a few teams. But that's not the topic here.

    Clawbots are generally considered a joke, but taking one and upgrading it could just be what you need to do to learn about engineering.

  12. Vyx

    Dec 10 Florida 82987A

    Clawbots are decent at the regional level

    they can flip caps on the grounds (which are rarely stacked on poles), do the low flags, and get on both platforms by using the arm to push themselves off the ground. I even saw one drag a big flywheel bot off the center platform

    @Cam The reason for vex is for kids/students to engineer robots and program them. If they use a claw bot (which is not good for their alliance) they are not learning the basics of engineering instead just copying an instruction manual. So a claw bot can be considered illegal.

    Clearly you missed the line that says

    Above that, use common sense as referenced in <G2>.

    How do clawbots being similar apply to a team switching out subsystems to make a radically different bot?

  13. Cam

    Dec 10 Ga Us ?

    https://www.vexforum.com/index.php/21291-how-to-determine-multiple-robots-are-identical/0

  14. TaranMayer

    Dec 11 Arizona 6142w

    @Nmarchal Hey does anyone know if for this season you can use the brain from last season?

    Yes. You can use your Cortex to your heart's content. If you have V5 I would strongly recommend using it. My coach seems to have different opinions (he's hiding the V5 until late season).

  15. sazrocks

    Dec 11 Arizona 2114V
    Edited 6 weeks ago by sazrocks

    @Cam https://www.vexforum.com/index.php/21291-how-to-determine-multiple-robots-are-identical/0

    You are disproving your own argument.
    From the first reply:

    Technically, having a robot that is completely identical to another wouldn't be a DQ in itself

    The rule you quoted has to do with multiple teams using the same physical robot, not the same design. In fact, the rule states this quite plainly:

    f you can place two robots on a
    table next to each other, and they look like two separate legal/complete robots (i.e. each have the 3
    Subsystems defined by <R1>), then they are two robots.

    Meaning, that if the robots can exist at the same time separately, then they are two robots and thus legal.

    Also, please, for the love of G2, use common sense.

    When reading and applying the various rules in this document, please
    remember that common sense always applies in the VEX Robotics Competition

    And not to mention, vex has long given loaner clawbots to teams with missing robots at the world championships. Are you seriously suggesting that such action by vex is just a ploy to DQ teams for fun? Come on.

 

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