catapult OP


#1

#2

flywheel gang:

  • easy
  • doesn’t need a lot of tuning
  • efficient

Catagang:

  • hard
  • lots of tuning
  • one shot two misses

#3

Catagang:

easy
doesn’t need a lot of tuning
efficient

flywheel gang:

hard
lots of tuning
one shot two misses


#4

yeah but:
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#5

also how does a flywheel miss twice with the same shot?


#6

Technically the flywheel misses 9 nines, but a two ball catapult misses 18 times. One miss per flag per ball.


#7

Cap bots op


#8

Flywheels are really hard to tune. Catapults, after you get it working, are very easy. No PID or anything.

Sure, there’s the whole missing twice thing, but once the driver stops making those errors constantly, it’s fine.


#9

I built a fully functioning, competition ready catapult robot in 3 days, all of which were school days. Catapults are an order of magnitude easier to build and tune than flywheels.

That said, flywheels integrate the flexibility of double shots (if you have an angle changing hood or insane code) with the flexibility of full court shooting- something that neither a catapult nor a puncher can do. Flywheels are cleaner looking as well, and they’re made much smaller and lower friction with the 600 RPM v5 cartridges.

Catapults are amazing for double shots, and they seem to hold up similarly to flywheels against defense. A flywheel is more readily defend-able because shooting takes longer, but a catapult is more devastated by timely defense because they release 2 balls instead of 1. The advantage of catapults is a 2 motor double shot, which opens the door for a 6m base, dedicated cap flippers etc, descorers, cap lifts, double parking magic… the list goes on. A flywheel system requires at least 3 motors with an angle changing hood, and with a separate indexer it requires 4.

Personally, I’m in love with my catapult and I can’t see myself changing anytime soon. I experimented with “meta” flywheels, punchers, double punchers, underhand flywheels (where the ball shoots from underneath the flywheel rather than on top of it), and a few other weird designs. Catapults are by far the easiest to drive and tune. And if they can be front loaded and hold up well against defense, I can envision at least 1 catapult on every single RR alliance.

To summarize, flywheels are more versatile if they are tuned extensively, catapults are better for newer teams and dominate the front zone better, and both designs can be made extremely viable.


#10

hm, you do have a point there.


#11

I use a puncher that is able to rotate to two designated heights with a rotateTo command, and using V5, I only use one motor for the puncher, and another motor for the rotation. This way I can get the middle and high flag from the same position, but I just shoot them one at a time, and a hold a second ball in my intake. No PID for this either, and the rotation of the puncher allows me to tune extremely easily, and I have full range of shooting for the entire field. Getting two flags with one two-shot catapult is pretty OP though, if you’re not being defended at least


#12

cool, I dig a good puncher


#13

Flywheels for SURE, need a lot more tuning. Getting RPM to be exact for certain locations as well as rapid fire is not going to be as easy as tuning a catapult. A tuned catapult can consistently flip two flags in one shot, if the driver has a substantial amount of practice.


#14

Puncher OP >:))


#15

One thing I have noticed is that flywheel’s and punchers hit harder whereas 2bc doesn’t. This happened to us at one competition where one of the fields the flags were really hard to turn and we couldn’t successfully do a single double shot.


#16

flywheel gang

gang gang