Continuous Motion Servo Motors

Can the VEX servo motors be converted to continuous motion?

Not such that they are competition-legal.

Also known as a motor?

A servo has 3 parts

a motor
a sensor
control to interface the two

So a servo that could continuously spin isn’t just a motor. It still has a sensor and control hardware inside.

right, also known as a potentiometer/rheostat. A potentiometer, in case you have never got the chance to handle one, can only turn so far in neither direction, which in turn makes a servo motor have limited motion. The way a servo works is that a pwm signal is sent to the control board, and depending on the length of the pulse, sets the target of the servo to a specific position. That target position is then send into a pid loop to control the motor to turn the output shaft to the desired position. The reason why a potentiometer is used instead of a rotary encoder is because cheap consumer servos were developed for use in RC airplanes and cars, which required that the servo knew where it’s starting position was, for ease of use and in case of a power spike that reset the onboard control system. Therefor, converting a servo to continuous rotation requires removal of the potentiometer, therefor making it no longer contain a sensor, and then the control board becomes useless, therefor should be removed. Unless op has enough electrical and mechanical knowledge to intigrate a rotary encoder into the servo shell and design a corrisponding control board, his “continuous rotation servo” is just a geared down motor.

You can drive the servos it you increment their value:

if (vexRT[Btn8U] == 1)
{
motor[servo] = motor[servo]++;
wait1Msec(50);
}

Thank you all for your input. The reason for my question, which perhaps I should have explained first, was that in the pre-VEX days we often turned simple servos into continuous motion “geared motors” for use in small scale robotics. I was just trying to determine if this was acceptable practice in VEX.
Again, thanks to everyone who responded. Especially Doug Moyers if that bit of programming, which I may try.