How to Secure These Hex Drive Couplers and Standoffs

I’m trying to use couplers and standoffs to make the tray “tilter” and I’m not sure how to secure them. There are drive shafts on both sides, so I can’t just make them automatically tight. Any advice?

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so I presume you mean that your struggling to make the shaft collars at both ends tight, right?
I like to tighten up my collars on my standoffs first, the small end of a vex wrench works pretty well on shaft collars, and then I attach it. if you’re still concerned perhaps use loctite on your standoff couplers.

This is what my team uses.

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How man y times can that be applied before running out on screws?

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This is the dilemma. Either I secure the coupler to the shaft first and then put the standoff’s on or I make it loose.

You need to take them off and assemble them completely before they go on the robot. Make sure you put the coupler in the shaft collar enough to hold on, but not enough to add friction to the axle it’s on.

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The way we do this is we shove one of our star-drive screwdrivers into the shaft collar to act as a spacer to prevent the coupler from digging into the screw/shaft. We then attach the coupler, use a little bit of thread-lock, and then attach the standoff. This way, the standoff does not come loose from the coupler, and thus prevents the coupler coming off from the collar given its forced into it by the standoff. I hope this helps!

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Put the shaft collars on a screw joint rather than a shaft joint.
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This way you can tighten the nylock to the point that the shaft collars are loose enough to rotate, but won’t be able to move around. You may want to drill through the holes in the shaft collars slightly to make them easier to work with. You should also use screw joints where they connect to the tray.
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