Slew control

I want to program a slew control and i was wondering is there any way to do it in easy C v5 if not are there other ways i can do it?

@ItzPie
Not sure if I can help much regarding Easy C specifically but it is definitely possible to do in RobotC. Check out jpearman’s post on slew rate control below:

https://vexforum.com/t/sprocket-and-chain/14951/1

To be honest if you are competent enough to know what slew rate is I suggest downloading ROBOTC for free.

I would agree with tabor, and honestly I do not believe you can do slew rate in easy C

Sure you can,
https://vexforum.com/index.php/conversation/post/61463

But I agree with Griffin, unless you are trying to implement this for next week then give RobotC a try.

Obviously as James showed in the linked thread, if your programming it using code instead of blocks you totally can do slew rate.

@jpearman i gave robot c a try and like nothing i did really worked on the robot like i wrote a program for the lcd and it worked on the emulator but when i tried to make it work on my robot it didnt work

One of the things I hope our students get out of VEX is the ability to examine a situation, identify important discriminators, develop theories, list possible explanations for what they observe, and design tests to determine which of the possible explanations best explains what they see.

To take a hypothetical situation, apropos of nothing, unrelated to any current topic, suppose someone had written a program and was unable to make it work. As I do with my kids sometimes, I’ll provide some potentional explanations. (Others may provide more.) Perhaps:

  1. The system for developing and running programs is unworkable and should be abandoned, or
  2. The system was used incorrectly, and more time should be invested in making it work, or finally,
  3. Programming is inexplicable, and does weird things when you don’t want it to.

I would then ask my kids which of their theories might best explain outside observations. Are others having similar issues? Has anyone anywhere ever accomplished what you’re trying to do? Has nobody ever done it? Those sorts of things.

Finally, I would ask them what tests they might conduct in order to rule out some of their theories, and zero in on the best and most likely explanation.

I’m not likely to accept “I tried that stuff, and it didn’t work.” Hypothetically.

I’ll note that my kids sometimes say bad things about me. (I’d give examples, but @DRow would just delete them.)

I tell myself it’s just terms of endearment.

Forgot to say: As I’m sure even @jpearman will attest, there is a lot of allure to option 3.