Tower help

Hey. Ok so my team has towers on our robot that have the intake arms attached. We were wondering if it would be smarter to attach one torque motor and a high strength axel or two torque motors on both sides with a regular axel.

Thanks

Definitely one torque with an HS axel.

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well that depends. if you can get away with only using one motor that could be the better option, as you save a motor for use elsewhere. but then again if you don’t have any other use for that second motor it could be a worthy home for it.

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Ok thanks so much for the help.

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Just some advice, if you do one motor and a hs axle you will need to brace the two sides of your arms very well. If you don’t one side will go up at a different rate and there will be major discrepancies in the position of your arms. P.S. if you think you have braced it enough, than you haven’t.

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@Cadaver_42 Thank you. But how do you mean by bracing the arms more? I’m a bit confused.

Here is the picture of what we used to have. The two motors on the top are for the towers. We r planning to just have the one motor tho

image

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using a 4m drive might be a better investment of that extra motor tbh, but Its really up to you, 2m can be acceptable.
another thing I’d add is you should maybe move those motors to the inside of your lift towers, or have something protected them, you wouldn’t want to snap off those motors (did this in itz, not fun)

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I reccomend allocating:

4m drive
2m intake
1m arms
1m tilter

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@Xenon27 thank you! I’ll suggest to my team bout putting the motor on the inside. Now that our lift is moved further up I think putting the motor inside may be better. Thanks again

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@TaranMayer. Thank you so much. I’ll suggest this to my team. However we only have 1 week left to complete our robot b/c we r saving a full week for testing. It was one of our major issues last time. Thanks again for ur help

You will want cross bracing between the arms. this can be done with stand offs, c channels, and I have seen it done with one by’s but I’m not sure how well that works. X shaped braces work well but if you don’t have the room for that you can just brace straight across. Another thing you can do if you have space is connect the gears driving the arms with stand offs. This will help the arms move at the same time with the most torque.

@Cadaver_42. Thank you so much. This advice will help a lot.

What we did (don’t do this, put a high strength axle through the towers, but we don’t have the towers connected together except for the cross bracing in the arms. We have one motor on one side, and rubber banding on the other. We used linear sliders for the crossbrasing --which worked quite well. I don’t recommend using standoffs as cross bracing because they are hard to attach (at least for our robot). Don’t waste another motor on the arm, it is just not necessary. Like @TaranMayer said, use a 4m drive, 1m arm, and 1m tilter. Speaking about your arms, I would recommend them flipping down from the top. Our team had compression issues with our intake, and then we solved them from having a vertical pivot point (it might seem unnecessary, our team thought it wasn’t until we switched, and it works like a thousand times better). I would recommend making your base thinner length wise because it looks like you have like a 16 inch base (I could be wrong). Our team didn’t consider this factor when designing our robot, and now it is ten times harder than it should be to stack two towers in the big zone. I guess these are all my tips, and I hope this helps your team.

Or use locks like I displayed a while back.

This topic helped me with tower stuff so you might want to take a look: Arm raising issues

Yeah, that’s what we did but then my team captain was like “Use this other system it’s better ,” so I was like “ok?” But there are multiple right ways to deal with compression issues and I guess he just didn’t like that system? I don’t know, but he’s the team captain. This system took maybe 20 minutes to switch, and it doesn’t need a locking mechanism. Me --as the main builder-- hate locking mechanisms because it seems like there is always a case where something goes wrong, and then it’s all my fault. All I’m saying is, all intake hinge designs achieve the same purpose --to achieve compression-- it’s just the matter of how they are built.

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Thank u all so much. This information is very useful and helpful

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