VEXiq Worlds 2014

The team list for VEXiq worlds is posted.
http://www.robotevents.com/robot-competitions/vex-iq-challenge/2014-vex-iq-challenge-world-championship.html

The agenda for VEXiq is a bit more relaxed than the usual VEX schedule.

My elementary team is excited to see all the teams from all over the world that they will get to compete with. We are looking forward to seeing our friends from VA (Potomac School and McLean Robotics Institute) and meeting new teams. As a former MS coach, it is nice to see a little more relaxed schedule.

3615A Triangle Tigers “A”

According to the rules posted in the link below, an event that qualifies teams for the World Championship must have a minimum of 10 teams competing. I see many State level qualifying events with less than 10 teams that qualified teams for Worlds. In one case, 2 of the 3 teams competing qualified for Worlds. This seems unfair to states where they have an active/competitive league.

Why are the rules not being followed in some cases?
http://www.roboticseducation.org/documents/2014/01/vex-iq-challenge-world-championship-qualifying-criteria.pdf

dnicks,

Given that this is the first year, it’s really hard to calculate the number that SHOULD advance, because there is NO history. Looking through that document, it looks like the number of teams advancing from each area was based on the number of teams registered. Unfortunately, that does not always directly relate to the number of teams that will actually compete.

Next year, there should be good data on the number and quality of teams from each area, so they will be able to do a much better job of balancing the number of teams advancing.

Steve

In Puerto Rico we had near 60 different teams registered. Of the 60 teams, about 50 attended regionals. According to the qualification criteria Puerto Rico should have 7 spots… but one of the teams at the state event won 2 of the passes, so we lost a spot at the world competition. It would have been nice if the spot was given to the next rank for the state that has not passed on to the world event. That way the state still gets the amount of passes based on participation + in our case the next team in ranks that did not qualified was one of the excellence award winners during one of the 3 regionals held in Puerto Rico.

I’m told about 50 teams registered in Indiana, but we only had 25 compete at the state tournament. I was surprised there were several teams that competed a week earlier in a regional tournament that did not attend the state event. There were 7 spots available, and two teams split 5 of them, meaning only 4 teams will advance.

The big question: Should the World Championship be limited to ONLY the best teams? Or should the second-best team advance in some cases?

Steve

As outlined in the Championship Qualifying Criteria document on the following web site, the number of teams selected from each state/region/province/country was determined on the basis of the number of registered VEX IQ teams in that state/region/province/country and the percentage of registered teams in this same area, in relation to the number of registered teams in the total VEX IQ program. In this inaugural VEX IQ season, unused or double qualified spots will not be replaced. Data will be collected for this inaugural season and included in the review of championship qualifying criteria for next season.

pfsmith,
Thanks for the explanation. I understand that being the first year, it is difficult to project the number of teams from each state, region, etc. However, I was asking about something different.
In the championship event qualifying criteria document (link below), it specifically states that in order for a state/region to receive the allocation of world championship spots, their second level qualifying event must include the participation of a minimum number of 10 registered VEX IQ teams. In looking at some of these qualifying events, not all qualifying events had 10 or more participating teams. In one case, a state event had 3 teams - and all 3 teams qualified and have registered for Worlds. Why is the minimum 10 team rule not being followed? How many teams who have signed up would not be going if that rule was being followed? How many teams on the wait list that come from competitive leagues may have gotten spots based on their skills challenge ranking, but won’t be because this rule wasn’t followed?
Our team is in a competitive league in a state with only 3 spots. They had some unfortunate match ups and were only a few points from winning the teamwork challenge. The kids were great sports about it and knew the rules and criteria for qualifying going into the tournament. The kids would love to qualify for worlds based on being in the top 25 world ranking on skills, but with so many teams already signed up - I doubt there will be any spots. If the 10 team minimum rule was followed - there may be some.

pfsmith,

Thanks for the explanation. I understand that being the first year, it is difficult to project the number of teams from each state, region, etc. However, I was asking about something different.

In the championship event qualifying criteria document (link below), it specifically states that in order for a state/region to receive the allocation of world championship spots, their second level qualifying event must include the participation of a minimum number of 10 registered VEX IQ teams. In looking at some of these qualifying events, not all qualifying events had 10 or more participating teams. In one case, a state event had 3 teams - and all 3 teams qualified and have registered for Worlds. Why is the minimum 10 team rule not being followed? How many teams who have signed up would not be going if that rule was being followed? How many teams on the wait list that come from competitive leagues may have gotten spots based on their skills challenge ranking, but won’t be because this rule wasn’t followed?

Our team has a very competitive robot based on skills. But we’re in a competitive league and had some unfortunate match ups in our competition. The kids would love to qualify for worlds based on being in the top 25 world ranking on skills.

~~pfsmith,
Thanks for the explanation. I understand that being the first year, it is difficult to project the number of teams from each state, region, etc. However, I was asking about something different.
In the championship event qualifying criteria document (link below), it specifically states that in order for a state/region to receive the allocation of world championship spots, their second level qualifying event must include the participation of a minimum number of 10 registered VEX IQ teams. In looking at some of these qualifying events, not all qualifying events had 10 or more participating teams. In one case, a state event had 3 teams - and all 3 teams qualified and have registered for Worlds. Why is the minimum 10 team rule not being followed? How many teams who have signed up would not be going if that rule was being followed? How many teams on the wait list that come from competitive leagues may have gotten spots based on their skills challenge ranking, but won’t be because this rule wasn’t followed?
Our team is in a competitive league in a state with only 3 spots. They had some unfortunate match ups and were only a few points from winning the teamwork challenge. The kids were great sports about it and knew the rules and criteria for qualifying going into the tournament. The kids would love to qualify for worlds based on being in the top 25 world ranking on skills, but with so many teams already signed up - I doubt there will be any spots. If the 10 team minimum rule was followed - there may be some.

http://www.roboticseducation.org/doc…g-criteria.pdf

There’s also a handful of teams that are registered that didn’t seem to earn spots. Teams that won a STEM award, or something like that, at a tournament that doesn’t have many teams advancing.

I understand teams from China and Australia. But not the ones that shouldn’t have qualified at US events.

Steve

Is there anyone from VEXIQ that can comment on dnicks post? That sounds extremely unfair, specially to the kids that actually have a competitive robot and skills.

The issue raised by dnicks is being addressed, so that the qualification process for teams to advance to the World Championship is as equitable as possible. Thank you for sharing your input.