<G12> Tipping a robot in Turning Point

#21

Well clearly I’m in the minority. It’s sad that others didn’t have the same experience I did.

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#22

Honestly, this isn’t a regular incident, the US open is run by the create organization, not the recf, so they use different rules in matches and in judging, this is why you can’t get to worlds by the us open

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#23

The tipping rule can be a difficult one to deal with. IThe process of pushing a robot off line from their attempt to shoot is NOT illegal. In the OP’s case, this push resulted in them being pushed into another robot, which caused them to tip may or may not be illegal. As a referee, I wold look at how the tipping interaction happened. If the pushing robot, in the act of pushing would have been able to pull back when they saw the robot that they were pushing begin to tip, yet continued pushing anyway, then a case could be made that the tipping was intentional. If the tip happened so fast, that the pushing robot could not have pulled away, then I would rule it as unintentional and just part of the game.

As for entanglement, in my opinion, this is also one of the misunderstood rules in the game. With the widespread use of the rubber band roller intakes this season, they open up the possibility of entanglement. However, the rule is written to prevent teams from building a robot or part of a robot that has the sole intention of entangling their opponent. Incidental entanglement is an expected part of game play and teams should attempt to build their robot in such a way to eliminate possible entanglement as much as possible. For example, my 536E team has covered their roller intake with mesh to prevent entanglement. There is a ruling on the official Q&A regarding entanglement.

https://www.robotevents.com/VRC/2018-2019/QA/262

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