Music?

Are you allowed to listen to music while driving? I feel like it would give me a boost.

thats a good one. i guess it would be allowed if u used an MP3 because of (G7)

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is blue tooth headphones legal? or do I have to use a wired one?

I am thinking if you follow this rule potentially.

<'G7> Only Drivers, and only in the Alliance Station. During a Match, all Drive Team Members must
remain in their Alliance Station. Drive Team Members are not allowed to use any sort of communication
devices during their Match. Devices with communication features turned off (e.g. a phone in airplane
mode) are allowed.

I am sure if the venue has WIFI the EP could still ask you to take your headphones out just so it doesn’t cause the potential for use of a communication device.

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So can I still use hard wired ones connecting to my airplane-mode phone?

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I think you would have to talk to EP’s at each event, I definitely think that you wouldn’t be allowed to do it at worlds

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alright thanks
20 char

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As a volunteer referee, I can almost guarantee that the EP and/or head ref will not allow you to have earbuds or headphones on while driving in a competition match (even if you are still following the rules) as they want to make sure that you are aware of what is going on, and are paying attention to any instructions given by the head ref during the match if something were to occur. Hopefully this helps.

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@vexvoltage

Bluetooth uses the 2.4 GHz frequency range and would thus interfere with VEXnet. Not legal (or at least significantly frowned upon).

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Well I never said Bluetooth was viable either?

Bluetooth ( IEEE 802.15 WPAN ) uses AFH to find if one of the 70~ channels is already saturated and will hop to another channel for communication, it also is a much lower power I think 1-3 mW (I know it is lower then WIFI). WIFI ( IEEE 802.11 ) being higher power range should actually be the device to take out Bluetooth not the other way around. Even with that VEXNet does channel hop using something like AFH to find un-saturated channels for clean communication, so that interference will not effect the robots unless all of the channels are completely saturated. Worlds is a perfect example of all the devices and robots still running without issues.

I still would not recommend using any device to listen to music at an event, it could be a safety hazard (IMO) and prevent the referee from talking to you about the current match.

I am sure James Pearman or one of the DWAB guys could give a much better explanation then I, I really only remember that much from my A+ Cert.

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I was just mentioning the potential for interference since you mentioned WiFi, and I made the (seemingly incorrect?) assumption that you were replying to the post above yours rather than the OP.

It would be a risk to listen to music because you have to listen to your team mates and the referee.

No worries, I think we can all agree to the point of do not listen to music during matches.

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Show them the ipod it’s plugged into.
Just to clarify, I’m saying listen on a music device, not a phone (like an MP3 already mentioned) the EP might let you use it if you show them, plus the wired headphones.

Still would be a little weary about this. If a referee is saying you are pinning and you do not hear him and get a DQ who is at fault for that? Team is not listening because it is being blocked by music.

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Yes it will be your fault, so music is kind of a “use at your own risk” thing. If you don’t hear the ref because it’s too loud, and your team member doesn’t notice, too bad. It’s your own fault.So yes, be weary if you do get to listen to music.

If I was in a position of authority at a tournament (e.g. head ref), I would only let you do this only if one ear was fully exposed and your volume was low enough that I couldn’t hear your music standing right next to you.

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I think that’s a good idea. If it were my tournament I would simply say "We suggest leaving one ear free, and keeping the volume low, but if you don’t want to you don’t have to. If you don’t hear a ref’s call, too bad. Run it at your own risk.

There are safety considerations at issue, which may be a risk to everyone, not just one team’s robot. If your robot needs to be disabled, you had best be able to hear the event staff clearly.

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Very good point.